Cultures > Shakkanakku Dynasty

Shakkanakku Dynasty

Background

The lion of Mari. (22nd century BC) The first member of the Shakkanakku dynasty on the lists is Ididish who was appointed in c. 2266 BC,[note 7][40] according to the lists, Ididish ruled for 60 years,[41] and was succeeded by his son making the position hereditary.[42] The third Mari followed the second city in terms of general structure,[43] phase P0 of the old royal palace was replaced by a new palace for the Shakkanakku.[44] Another smaller palace was built in the eastern part of the city,[45] and contained royal burials that date to the former periods.[46] The ramparts were rebuilt and strengthened while the embankment was turned into a defensive wall that reached 10 meters in width.[44] The former sacred inclosure was maintained,[44] so was the temple of Ninhursag. However, the temples of Ninni-Zaza and Ishtarat disappeared,[44] while a new temple called the "temple of lions" (dedicated to Dagan),[47] was built by the Shakkanakku Ishtup-Ilum and attached to it, was a rectangular terrace (ziggurat) that measured 40 x 20 meters for sacrifices.[44][45][48] Akkad disintegrated following Shar-Kali-Sharri's reign,[49] and Mari gained its independence, but the use of the Shakkanakku title continued during the following Third Dynasty of Ur period.[50] A princess of Mari married the son of king Ur-Nammu of Ur,[51][52] and Mari was nominally under Ur hegemony.[53] However, the vassalage did not impede the independence of Mari,[54][55] and some Shakkanakkus used the royal title Lugal in their votive inscriptions, while using the title of Shakkanakku in their correspondence with the Ur's court.[56] The dynasty ended for unknown reasons not long before the establishment of the next dynasty, which took place in the second half of the 19th century BC.[57][58][59]

Sources

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources