People > Ashur-etli-Ilani

Ashur-etli-Ilani

Background

Ashur-etil-ilani King of Assyria Reign ca. 631 – ca. 627 BC Predecessor Ashurbanipal Successor Sin-shumu-lishir Died 627 BC Father Ashurbanipal Ashur-etil-ilani was a king of Assyria (ca. 631 BC – ca. 627 BC). He succeeded his father Ashurbanipal. Contents [hide] 1 Problems with source material 2 Reign 3 Dating his reign 4 Notes Problems with source material[edit] The reconstruction of the events occurring during Ashur-etil-ilani's rule has proven to be very difficult. One noteworthy problem is the complete absence of sources from central Assyria covering this time, and the lack of official recordings of events (e.g. royal inscriptions). The most important source for this period is the "Nabopolassar Chronicle", which, however, is quite fragmentary for this period. Reign[edit] The death of Ashurbanipal between 631 and 627 BC opened the way for a serious struggle for the control of Assyria between several pretenders which was to lead to the downfall of the Neo Assyrian Empire. The contest may have actually begun a few years earlier during Ashurbanipal's lifetime. The development of the events, and even the number of parties involved is not known with certainty. It does seem certain that upon Ashurbanipal's death, allied hordes of Scythians, Cimmerians, Medes and Persians, taking advantage of Assyria's weakness due to internal strife, crossed the borders of the Assyrian Empire, destroying Ashkelon and raiding as far as Egypt. Calah (Nimrud) was burned, but the strong walls of Nineveh protected the remnants of the Assyrian army that had taken refuge behind them. When the raiders had passed on to other regions, a new palace was erected among the ruins of the neighbouring city. But its architectural poverty and small size show that the resources of Assyria were at a low ebb. Dating his reign[edit] According to the Harran Inscription of Nabonidus, Ashur-etil-ilani reigned for three years, but there is a contract from Nippur dated to his fourth year. It thus seems that he succeeded Ashurbanipal in 627 BC and ruled until 623 BC. This raises some problems over the dating of events from the Assyrian-Babylonian war.[1] Ashur-etil-ilani must therefore have succeeded to the Assyrian throne before 627 BC. It has been suggested that his reign actually overlapped with Ashurbanipal's. However, it is more likely that Ashurbanipal died before 627 BC because there is no evidence of a co-regency. Therefore, it has been suggested that Ashurbanipal died in 631 BC and that Ashur-etil-ilani was the Assyrian king until 627 BC.[2] There are still issues over some dates which conflict with this conclusion, but these dates seem to best support the available evidence.[3] He was succeeded by Sin-shumu-lishir who deposed him. Notes[edit] Jump up ^ See for this discussion S. Zawadzki, The Fall of Assyria p. 39-41 Jump up ^ N. Na'aman, ZA 81 1991 Jump up ^ S. Zawadzki, ZA 85 1995 p. 71-73 Preceded by Ashurbanipal King of Assyria ca. 631–627 BC Succeeded by Sin-shumu-lishir

Assyrian King List

King Name Years of Rule Kingdom
Eriba-Adad I 1380–1353 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-uballit I 1353–1318 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Enlil-nirari 1317–1308 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Arik-den-ili 1307–1296 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Adad-nirari I 1295–1264 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shalmaneser I 1263–1234 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Tukulti-Ninurta I 1233–1197 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nadin-apli 1196–1194 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nirari III 1193–1188 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Enlil-kudurri-usur 1187–1183 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ninurta-apal-Ekur 1182–1180 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-Dan I 1179-1133 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ninurta-tukulti-Ashur 1333 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Mutakkil-nusku 1333 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-resh-ishi I 1133-1115 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Tiglath-Pileser I 1115-1076 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Asharid-apal-Ekur 1076-1074 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-bel-kala 1074-1056 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Eriba-Adad II 1056-1054 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shamshi-Adad IV 1054-1050 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nasir-pal I 1050-1031 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shalmaneser II 1031-1019 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nirari IV 1019-1013 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-rabi II 1013-972 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-resh-ishi II 972-967 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Tiglath-Pileser II 967-935 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-Dan II 935-912 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Adad-nirari II 912-891 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Tukulti-Ninurta II 891-884 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nasir-pal II 884-859 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shalmaneser III 859-824 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shamshi-adad V 824-811 BCE Middle Assyrian Empire
Shammu-ramat 811-808 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Adad-nirari III 811-783 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Shalmeneser IV 783-773 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Ashur-dan III 773-755 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Ashur-nirari V 755-745 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Tiglath-Pileser III 745-727 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Shalmaneser V 727-722 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Sargon II 722–705 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Sennacherib 705–681 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Esarhaddon 681–669 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Ashurbanipal 669–631 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Ashur-etli-ilani 631-627 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Sin-shumu-lishir 626 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Sin-shar-ishkun 627-612 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire
Ashur-uballit II 612-608 BCE Neo-Assyrian Empire

Sources

Primary Sources

Secondary Sources